Monday, February 09, 2009

PROVINCIAL OFFICIALS: Theirs or ours?

Today's piece of found humor comes from the LA Times A-section story, "Washington's Man in Tehran" by Borzou Daragahi. He may or may not have a wry and subversive sense of things. Or maybe he's just a perfectly unselfconscious tape-recording machine.

The Times piece was a profile of someone you've never heard of, Philippe Welti, a Swiss diplomat who does double duty as America's representative in Iran.

At the heart of the piece was a description of Welti's impressions of Iran and its people. And it speaks for itself, so DD has only added a few italic'd asides.

"But Welti's initial euphoria gave way to a more negative view of the nation as he gained a more thorough understanding of Iran's political and social system ... he came to believe the Islamic Republic was 'not at the level of its aspirations or its claims '... He saw mendacious officials manipulate public opinion and was disappointed by the cynicism of some top officials who rationalized away concerns about human rights and freedom of expression by labeling them 'Western concepts.'"

But wait, pot -- kettle -- black, it gets better.

"Welti was struck by the provincialism of the officials, many of them recent arrivals to the capital from rural backwaters ... 'I got the impression that there are officials who do not know the world well,'" the stateman told the Times reporter.

"He found himself frustrated with both the stubbornness of [the] conservative camp and the weakness of its reformists ... After a couple of years in [fill in the blank] and watching the transition from [fill in the blank] to [fill in the blank], he concluded that it would be tough to change America's Iran's foreign policies."

1 Comments:

Blogger João o Ião said...

LOL, talk of glass roofs...

These are the days i enjoy being Portuguese and not have to take all that crappy propaganda.

Ha... Hollywood with shiny heroes and waving flags....

have a nice day DD and watch out for BB

João

2:26 PM  

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